Machinery's Encyclopedia; A Work of Reference Covering Practical Mathematics and Mechanics, Machine Design, Machine Construction and Operation, Electrical, Gas, Hydraulic, and Steam Power Machinery, Metallurgy, and Kindred Volume 1

Machinery's Encyclopedia; A Work of Reference Covering Practical Mathematics and Mechanics, Machine Design, Machine Construction and Operation, Electrical, Gas, Hydraulic, and Steam Power Machinery, Metallurgy, and Kindred Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1917 edition. Excerpt: ...a capacious well holding sufiicient oil to last for a long period (Fig. 6) with provision for the return of the waste oil by a channel from the end or ends of the bearing. Figs. 7 and 8 show two variations in practice, the first having a side fed well, and a pad contained in a brass holder pressed by a spring, and the second a modified arrangement, with the oiler set vertically. This disposition is sometimes more convenient for certain machines than placing it on top of the bearing cap, and there is the advantage that grit cannot reach the spindle, as it may when the supply is poured down from above. Altematively to the fitting of a pad, wicking is sometimes adopted, Fig. I7, feeding to the top side of the shaft, the ends being joined to prevent displacement. One or two such wicks are provided, according to the length of bearing. Ring Oiling.--A system most extensively employed for spindles and shafts is the ringoiling method, which insures a larger flow than is caused by the pad device. It is used in conjunction with a reservoir for each bearing, or with a reservoir or box common to several bearings. If a gear-box, for example, has a body of oil into which the gears run, passages can be arranged to lead to the bearing wells, which simplifies arrangements; or the bearings may be constructed in a self-contained manner if they lie out of the plane of the oil box. Fig. I6 shows a section through a typical ring-oiling bearing, with a well of moderate capacity, and channels for the return of oil into it. The hub of the gear to the left has a V-shaped projection tumed on it to prevent the passage of oil, which is thrown off this high part into the recessed collar-nut; and, when the spindle comes to rest, the oil on the surface drops off into...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 420 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 22mm | 744g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236904265
  • 9781236904263