Machinery for Refrigeration; Being Sundry Observations with Regard to the Principal Appliances Employed in Ice Making and Refrigeration, and Upon the Laws Relating to the Expansion and Compression of Gases

Machinery for Refrigeration; Being Sundry Observations with Regard to the Principal Appliances Employed in Ice Making and Refrigeration, and Upon the Laws Relating to the Expansion and Compression of Gases

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1900 edition. Excerpt: ...12.387 X 14.7, e 1.36935 or 493 --"' - 2.7074 This fraction, 0.36935, is therefore a constant, which, when multiplied by the weight in pounds, and temperature of the gas in degrees absolute, and divided by the pressure in pounds per square inch, will give the volume in cubic feet; or conversely, the pressure at any volume in cubic feet, of one pound of air. Thus--r/3=24frllb-fair The following table gives the value of this co-efficient (a) for six different gases, and any one of these values, multiplied by 144, gives the co-efficient (a) for pounds per square foot: VOLUME, PRESSURE AND TEMPERATURE OF GASES. Constants (a) for the equation VP = a (72+461). The volume of one pound of, say, ammoniacalgas, within ordinary working temperatures and pressures, is found as follows by the use of this co-efficient: -- 7H-461 1.596 P That is, take the weight of ammonia in pounds, multiply it by the absolute temperature, and divide it by 1.598 times the absolute pressure per square inch, to give you the volume in cubic feet. To find the pressure of any volume of one pound of ammonia: --1.596 V To find the density or weight in pounds of a cubic foot of ammonia at a given temperature and pressure: --JL596_/ 74-461 THE SPECIFIC HEAT OF GASES. In the earlier part of this volume, there is a table of the specific heats of a number of solid substances; these in all cases may be taken as constant quantities. M. Regnault is the authority for the assumption that the specific heat of a given volume of any one of the permanent gases is also practically constant for all temperatures and pressures, inasmuch as the variation through 360 degrees is not more than 0.2377. But gas has the property, which solids have not, of altering its volume...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 80 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 159g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236524845
  • 9781236524843