M'Culloch S Universal Gazetteer; A Dictionary, Geographical, Statistical, and Historical, of the Various Countries, Places, and Principal Natural Objects in the World Volume 2

M'Culloch S Universal Gazetteer; A Dictionary, Geographical, Statistical, and Historical, of the Various Countries, Places, and Principal Natural Objects in the World Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1855 edition. Excerpt: ...earliest accounts of Ihe existence of Palmyra nre derived from ihe sacred writings, which state that "Solomon built Tadmor iu the wilderness, and all the stone cities which he built in Hnmath" (2 Citron, viii. 3, 4), and his motive for thus founding il was, according to Josephus, "because in that place were fountains and wells of water. He gave it the name of Tadmoi, which is still pre Talent among the Syrians; but the Creeks name it Palmy ra." (Jint../ml. I. vlii. ch. G.) Pliny has noticed the city, and the peculiarities in its situation to which it owed its rise and importance: Palmyru, urOs nobilis situ, divitits soli tl aquis amanis J vasto un dique ambitu arenis includit agros; ac vclut terris ettmpUg a rcrum natura, pricata sortr inter duo imperii suatmti, Horn an ur um Parthorumque; et prima in discordia semper utrimque cura. (Hist. JYal.. lib. v. cap. 25.) The fertility of the oasis round Palmyra made it a suitable situation for a small town; but its position in other resccts was stilt more advantageous, from its being the resting-place of the caravans between ihe Persian gulf nnd ihe great cities on the Euphrates and Tigris, and Aleppo. Damascus und the ports on the Mediterranean. Palmyra thus became a principal emporium of the commerce between the eastern nnd western worlds; und to this no doubt, is lo be ascribed the wealth and importance to which she early attained. Being situated between the empires of Rome and Parthin, it was an object of gnat importance with the Palniyreninns to preserve n strict neutrality, and to keep on good terms with them both. Bui nficr the victories of Trajan had established the unquestionable preponderance of the Roman arms, Palmyra liecame a dependency of Rome, and attained to...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 748 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 38mm | 1,311g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123694142X
  • 9781236941428