Lost Chords

Lost Chords : White Musicians and Their Contribution to Jazz

4.26 (26 ratings by Goodreads)
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Description

The purpose of this text is to reclaim the role white musicians have played in jazz from early in the 20th century to the end of the Second World War, stressing that jazz is an American, not just an African-American, form of musical experience. The emphasis is on individual musicians and their accomplishments - plus a few especially influential big bands. The book rediscovers individual figures and styles of jazz that have been virtually ignored for half a century.show more

Product details

  • Hardback | 1072 pages
  • 165.1 x 241.3 x 60.96mm | 1,360.77g
  • Oxford University Press Inc
  • New York, United States
  • English
  • 30 halftones, bibliography
  • 0195055853
  • 9780195055856

Review quote

"Sudhalter's monumental contribution to the complex story of American music is without precedent. Let no one search Lost Chords for revisionist history: this history-within-history has never been written before--certainly not with such breadth, depth, and musicianly insight. And let no one hunt here for polemics: there are none. What is here is an extraordinary summing-up of three decades of music-making by jazzmen (poet Carl Sandburg's 1920 addition to the American language), who listened to and jammed with other 'cats of any color' (to appropriate Louis Armstrong's collegial, and typically generous, salute to fellow musicians), and who then passed along to all within earshot of nightly coast-to-coast remote-control broadcasts and omnipresent recording what they had learned and nourished."--James T. Maher"Deep-dyed fans...surely will be overjoyed by the range, depth, and readability--Sudhalter is no academic drudge, but an ace writer--of his coverage.... No jazz collection--no music collection--should be without it."--Booklist"[Sudhalter's] enthusiasm for the subject carries across and the book earns the biggest compliment that any book about music can earn: it makes you want to hear again the songs you know and to seek out those you do not. This is no small achievement."--Marc A. Mamigonian, The Boston Book Review "Sudhalter's monumental contribution to the complex story of American music is without precedent. Let no one search Lost Chords for revisionist history: this history-within-history has never been written before--certainly not with such breadth, depth, and musicianly insight. And let no one hunt here for polemics: there are none. What is here is an extraordinary summing-up of three decades of music-making by jazzmen (poet Carl Sandburg's 1920 addition to the American language), who listened to and jammed with other 'cats of any color' (to appropriate Louis Armstrong's collegial, and typically generous, salute to fellow musicians), and who then passed along to all within earshot of nightly coast-to-coast remote-control broadcasts and omnipresent recording what they had learned and nourished."--James T. Maher "Deep-dyed fans...surely will be overjoyed by the range, depth, and readability--Sudhalter is no academic drudge, but an ace writer--of his coverage.... No jazz collection--no music collection--should be without it."--Booklist "[Sudhalter's] enthusiasm for the subject carries across and the book earns the biggest compliment that any book about music can earn: it makes you want to hear again the songs you know and to seek out those you do not. This is no small achievement."--Marc A. Mamigonian, The Boston Book Review "Sudhalter's monumental contribution to the complex story of American music is without precedent. Let no one search Lost Chords for revisionist history: this history-within-history has never been written before--certainly not with such breadth, depth, and musicianly insight. And let no one hunt here for polemics: there are none. What is here is an extraordinary summing-up of three decades of music-making by jazzmen (poet Carl Sandburg's 1920 addition to the American language), who listened to and jammed with other 'cats of any color' (to appropriate Louis Armstrong's collegial, and typically generous, salute to fellow musicians), and who then passed along to all within earshot of nightly coast-to-coast remote-control broadcasts and omnipresent recording what they had learned and nourished."--James T. Maher "Deep-dyed fans...surely will be overjoyed by the range, depth, and readability--Sudhalter is no academic drudge, but an ace writer--of his coverage.... No jazz collection--no music collection--should be without it."--Booklist "[Sudhalter's] enthusiasm for the subject carries across and the book earns the biggest compliment that any book about music can earn: it makes you want to hear again the songs you know and to seek out those you do not. This is no small achievement."--Marc A. Mamigonian, The Boston Book Review "Sudhalter's monumental contribution to the complex story of American music is without precedent. Let no one search Lost Chords for revisionist history: this history-within-history has never been written before--certainly not with such breadth, depth, and musicianly insight. And let no one hunthere for polemics: there are none. What is here is an extraordinary summing-up of three decades of music-making by jazzmen (poet Carl Sandburg's 1920 addition to the American language), who listened to and jammed with other 'cats of any color' (to appropriate Louis Armstrong's collegial, andtypically generous, salute to fellow musicians), and who then passed along to all within earshot of nightly coast-to-coast remote-control broadcasts and omnipresent recording what they had learned and nourished."--James T. Maher"Deep-dyed fans...surely will be overjoyed by the range, depth, and readability--Sudhalter is no academic drudge, but an ace writer--of his coverage.... No jazz collection--no music collection--should be without it."--Booklist"[Sudhalter's] enthusiasm for the subject carries across and the book earns the biggest compliment that any book about music can earn: it makes you want to hear again the songs you know and to seek out those you do not. This is no small achievement."--Marc A. Mamigonian, The Boston Book Reviewshow more

About Richard M. Sudhalter

Richard M. Sudhalter is a highly respected musician, one of today's outstanding trumpet players. A noted critic, broadcaster, and historian, he was co author of Bix: Man and Legend, still cited as the definitive Beiderbecke biography. He lives on Long Island's North Fork.show more

Rating details

26 ratings
4.26 out of 5 stars
5 42% (11)
4 42% (11)
3 15% (4)
2 0% (0)
1 0% (0)
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