The London Medical Dictionary; Including, Under Distinct Heads, Every Branch of Medicine ... with Whatever Relates to Medicine in Natural Philosophy, Chemistry, and Natural History Volume 2

The London Medical Dictionary; Including, Under Distinct Heads, Every Branch of Medicine ... with Whatever Relates to Medicine in Natural Philosophy, Chemistry, and Natural History Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1819 edition. Excerpt: ...moments after the discharge; and they soon die, leaving some light brilliant crystals, resembling two cones united at their bases. They are discovered only in a mild temperature, and when the fluid has been at perfect rest. According to Vauquelin, in the Journal de Physique, the taste of the fresh semen is sharp and somewhat pungent. Its aroma, he observes, is faint; though Plenck speaks of it as strong, peculiar, and not unpleasant. Ve find a similar smcll in the roots of the orchis, the down of chestnuts, and the antherx of several plants. In some animals it is so strong, particularly in the season of their amours, as to taint the flesh. VVhcn fresh, it changes the blue colour of vegetables to a green, pmcipitates calcareous and metallic salts from their solutions: experiments which equally show some disengaged alkali. When part of its caloric is lost, it thickens, and be comes transparent; but on more perfect cooling is again fluid. 'Vhen cold, also, its weight is diminished. Exposed to cold air it is soon covered with a pellicle, and deposits crystals in the form of quadrilateral columns. terminated by quadrii'.tteral pyramids, which were found to be phosphorated lime, previously held in solution. Other crystals were afterwards formed. which consisted of carbonated soda. 'hcn dried, it is semitransparcnt, like horn; but in a moister atmosphere it becomes ycllow, like the yolk of an egg, and smells highly putrid. By heat it svells, blackcns, and, when the moisture is evaporated, yields empyrcumatic ammoniacal vapours: the salts already mentioned are found in the coal. One hundred parts of fresh semen wortfound to contain ninety of water, six of fibrin, one of soda, and three of phosphat of lime. Vauquelin concludes his analysis by...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 35mm | 1,220g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236744810
  • 9781236744814