The London Encyclopaedia; Or Universal Dictionary of Science, Art, Literature, and Practical Mechanics, Comprising a Popular View of the Present State

The London Encyclopaedia; Or Universal Dictionary of Science, Art, Literature, and Practical Mechanics, Comprising a Popular View of the Present State

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1829 edition. Excerpt: ...as long as the times of Hippocrates and Celsus, who both mention it. The recipe, detailed below, has been administered to nearly three hundred animals of different kinds, as horses, cows, sheep, swine, and dogs: and appears to have succeeded in nineteen out of every twenty cases, where it was fairly taken and kept on the stomach. It appears also equally efficacious in the human subject; in which case he advises the extirpation of the bitten parts also. The box preventive is thus directed to be prepared: --Take of the fresh leaves of the tree-box two ounces, of the fresh leaves of rue two ounces, of sage half an ounce, chop these fine, and boil in a pint of water to half a pint; strain carefully, and press out the liquor very firmly; put back the ingredients into a pint of milk, and boil again to half a pint; strain as before; mix both liquors, which forms three doses for a human subject. Double this quantity is proper for a horse or cow. Twothirds of the quantity is sufficient for a large dog, half for a middling-sized, and one-third for a small dog. Three doses are sufficient, given each subsequent morning, fasting; the quantity directed being that which forms these three doses. As it sometimes produces strong effects on dogs, it may be proper to begin with a small dose; but in the case of dogs we hold it always prudent to increase the dose till effects are evident, by the sickness, panting, and uneasiness of the dog. In the human subject, where this remedy appears equally efficacious, we have never witnessed any unpleasant or active effects, neither are such observed in cattle of any kind: but candor obliges us to add, that in a considerable proportion of these, other means were used, as the actual or potential cautery, but in all the animals..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 788 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 40mm | 1,379g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236591380
  • 9781236591388