The Logic of Science; A Translation of the Posterior Analytics of Aristotle with Notes and an Introduction

The Logic of Science; A Translation of the Posterior Analytics of Aristotle with Notes and an Introduction

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1850 edition. Excerpt: ... atomic negative. Were there a middle term and proof, one of them must have a genus: for the proof must fall into the first or second figure. If in the first, B has the genus, for the minor premiss of this figure must be affirmative: if in the second, one or the other must have the genus, for either premiss may be negative, but not both. Under these conditions a negative proposition may be indivisible or atomic. CHAPTER XVI. ERROR IN PRINCIPLE. 1. Ignorance, that is not merely the negative but the contrary of knowledge, is either direct or concluded; and either of mediate or of immediate propositions. "Ignorance of immediate or primary propositions, whether affirmative or negative, if a direct belief, admits of no varieties: if a concluded error, it may arise under several conditions. 2. Let the proposition, no B is A, be an indivisible or atomic truth. If you conclude that all B is A, by a middle term C, you are deceived by deduction: and either both, or only one of your premisses, all C is A all B is C, may be false. Both may be false: for it is possible that the statement, all C is A, is false; and, as the proposition, no B is A, is primary, and B can therefore have no genus, the statement, all B is C, is also false. Or one of the premisses may be true: but this can only be the major, all C is A. The minor, all B is C, must be false; for, if the proposition, no B is A, is primary, B can have no genus. The major, all C is A, may be true; for the propositions,1 all C is A no B is A, whether mediate or immediate, are quite consistent with the proposition, no B is C. 3. This is the only manner in which we can conclude a false affirmative, for only the first figure concludes an affirmative universal. A false negative may...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 52 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 109g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236557816
  • 9781236557810