The Logic of Markedness

The Logic of Markedness

By (author) 

Free delivery worldwide

Available. Dispatched from the UK in 3 business days
When will my order arrive?

Description

Theories of language espoused by linguists during much of this century have assumed that there is a hierarchy to the elements of language such that certain constructions, rules, and features are unmarked while others are marked; "play" for example, is unmarked or neutral, while "played" or "player" is marked. This opposition, referred to as markedness, is one of the concepts which both Chomskyan generative grammar and Jakobsonian structuralism appear to share, yet which each tradition has treated differently. Battistella studies the historical development of the concept of markedness in the Prague School structuralism of Roman Jakobson, its importation into generative linguistics, and its subsequent development within Chomsky's Principles and Parameters framework. He traces how structuralist and generative linguistics have drawn on and expanded the notion of markedness, both as a means of characterizing linguistic constructs and as a theory of the innate language faculty.show more

Product details

  • Hardback | 188 pages
  • 164.3 x 243.1 x 21.1mm | 572.3g
  • Oxford University Press Inc
  • New York, United States
  • English
  • New.
  • 0195103947
  • 9780195103946

Back cover copy

Theories of language espoused by linguists during much of this century have assumed that there is a hierarchy to the elements of language such that certain constructions, rules, and features are unmarked while others are marked; "happy" for example, is unmarked or neutral, while "unhappy" is marked. This opposition, referred to as markedness, is one of the concepts which both Chomskyan generative grammar and Jakobsonian structuralism appear to share, yet which each tradition has treated differently. Edwin Battistella studies the historical development of the concept of markedness in the Prague School structuralism of Roman Jakobson, its importation into generative linguistics, and its subsequent development within Chomsky's "principles and parameters" framework. He traces how structuralist and generative linguistics have drawn on and expanded the notion of markedness, both as a means of characterizing linguistic constructs and as a theory of the innate language faculty. Rather than proposing a new theory of markedness, The Logic of Markedness studies the evolution of the concept and its treatment in two different but related linguistic frameworks, and as such will appeal to many linguists interested in markedness, in Jakobsonian and Chomskyan theories of grammar, and in language acquisition.show more

Review quote

informative, interesting and generally reader-friendly book ... The strongest aspects of this thought-provoking and very valuable book are the extreme richness of the sample of markedness literature that is surveyed ... the concise and clear summaries of individual bits of research; the insightful syntheses of relevant work from divergent fields ... and the novel application of markedness to the use of the English genitive markers, name formats, and punctuation marks. * Journal of Linguistics *show more