Living with Herds

Living with Herds : Human-Animal Coexistence in Mongolia

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Description

Domestic animals have lived with humans for thousands of years and remain essential to the everyday lives of people throughout the world. In this book, Natasha Fijn examines the process of animal domestication in a study that blends biological and social anthropology, ethology and ethnography. She examines the social behavior of humans and animals in a contemporary Mongolian herding society. After living with Mongolian herding families, Dr Fijn has observed through firsthand experience both sides of the human-animal relationship. Examining their reciprocal social behavior and communication with one another, she demonstrates how herd animals influence Mongolian herders' lives and how the animals themselves are active partners in the domestication process.show more

Product details

  • Electronic book text
  • CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
  • Cambridge University Press (Virtual Publishing)
  • Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • 52 b/w illus. 11 tables
  • 1139007467
  • 9781139007467

Review quote

'The author contextualises her ethnographic and auto-ethnographic research with reference to ethological studies as much as with anthropological and this approach is more than justified ... this book is a significant contribution for those engaged in the study of East and Central Asian cultures, as well as those interested in pastoralists and human-animal relationships more generally.' Journal of the Royal Asiatic Societyshow more

Table of contents

Part I. Crossing Boundaries: Prologue; 1. Introduction; 2. A Mongolian etho-ethnography; Part II. The Social Herd: 3. Social spheres; 4. Names, symbols, colours and breeding; 5. Multi-species enculturation; 6. Tameness and control; Part III. Living with Herds: 7. In the land of the horse; 8. The cycle of life; 9. The domestic and the wild; 10. The sacred animal; Conclusion.show more