Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets; Editor's Preface. Life of Samuel Johnson. Abraham Cowley. Sir John Denham. John Milton. Samuel Butler. Earl of Rochester. Earl of Roscommon. Thomas Otway. Edmund Waller. John Dryden. John Volume 1

Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets; Editor's Preface. Life of Samuel Johnson. Abraham Cowley. Sir John Denham. John Milton. Samuel Butler. Earl of Rochester. Earl of Roscommon. Thomas Otway. Edmund Waller. John Dryden. John Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1857 edition. Excerpt: ...at length a libel against me." These copieyRis they gathered faults, were apparently manuscript; and he lived in an age very unlike ours, if many hundred copies of fourteen hundred Hues were likely to be transcribed. An author has a right to print his own works, and need not seek an apology in falsehood; but he that could bear to write the dedication felt no pain in writing the 'eface. 'Aureng Zebe' (1676) is a tragedy founded on the actions of a great prince then reigning, but over nations not likely to employ their critics upon the transactions of the English stage. If he had known and disliked his own character, our trade was not in those times secure from his resentment. His country is at such a distance, that the manners might be safely falsified, and the incidents feigned; for the remoteness of place is remarked by Racine to afford the same conveniences to a poet as length of time. This play is written in rhyme, and has the appearance of being the most elaborate of all the dramas. The personages are imperial; but the dialogue is often domestic, and therefore susceptible of sentiments accommodated to familiar incidents. The complaint of life M is celebrated, and there are many other passages that may be read with pleasure. This play is addressed to the Earl of Mulgrave, afterwards Duke of Buckingham, himself, if not a poet, yet a writer of verses, and a critic. In this address Dryden gave the first hints of his intention to write an epic poem. He mentions his design in terms so obscure, that he seems afraid lest his plan should be purloined, as, he says, happened to him when he told it more plainly in his preface to Juvenal. "The subject," says he, "you know is great, the story English, and neither too far distant from...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 236 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 13mm | 426g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236539656
  • 9781236539656