Lives of Lord Castlereagh and Sir Charles Stewart, the Second and Third Marquesses of Londonderry; With Annals of Contemporary Events in Which They Bore a Part

Lives of Lord Castlereagh and Sir Charles Stewart, the Second and Third Marquesses of Londonderry; With Annals of Contemporary Events in Which They Bore a Part

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1861 edition. Excerpt: ...so entirely at variance with the previous policy of the country and the strongest recommendations of its ablest statesmen. Men were startled by the adoption of a warfare so different from any which Mr Fox had recommended, or Mr Pitt had practised; they could not get over the constant assertions of the Opposition, that it was in vain to attempt to contend with France on the Continent, and that the only way was to husband our resources for the defence of our own shores. The repeated defeats experienced in the former years of the war with small expeditions, appeared to give too much countenance to these ideas. In this state of general opinion, the sending 70,000 British troops at once to the Continent seemed little short of an act of insanity, which the retreat from Talavera and repulse at Walcheren must for ever condemn as fatal, if pursued, to the best interests of the country. They were ignorant of what time has since revealed, that both of these abortive expeditions were conceived on the justest principles, and on the verge of the most splendid success; that but for the tardiness of Lord Chatham, and disregard of Lord Castlereagh's instructions, the last would have led to the destruction of Chap. half the remaining naval resources of the enemy; the m. first, but for the obstinacy of Cuesta, have brought the i809. allied standards in triumph to Madrid. In a word, the new and resolute mode of warfare originally conceived by Lord Castlereagh and Sir Charles Stewart, and afterwards executed by Wellington, met with the same reception, when first introduced, that the discovery of Watt did from practical mechanics, and its application to sailing vessels from philosophers. There is nothing excites such animosity among men, as disturbing settled ideas;...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 264 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 14mm | 476g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236561635
  • 9781236561633