Liver-Rot in Sheep; Reprint, by Permission, of Articles in the Journal of the Royal Argicultural Society of England, with Copy of Correspondence Between the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries and the Royal Agricultural Society of England,

Liver-Rot in Sheep; Reprint, by Permission, of Articles in the Journal of the Royal Argicultural Society of England, with Copy of Correspondence Between the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries and the Royal Agricultural Society of England,

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Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1904 edition. Excerpt: ...stock it has been spread between Derby and Ashbourne, where there are no flooded lands; it has left not a sheep in the parish of Murchiston; even the mountain sheep on the Peak have been affected. All parasitic diseases, he remarks, have recently been on the increase; hoose amongst young cattle and sheep has been especially common. Many cattle have been attacked by flukes; many deaths have occurred, especially amongst yearlings. Animals whose livers have previously been injured by the continued residence of many flukes, if a 'second time attacked, very certainly and speedily perish. Within the last few months he has seen two horses die from liver flukes, one, a six-year-old, grazed last summer on a flooded meadow. Judgingfrom their coats and poverty, many colts are this winter infested, and deaths are now occurring amongst those left out starving in the unsheltered fields. Derbyshire farmers, he continued, are not 'yet sufliciently alive to the importance of protecting their live-stock from inclemency of weather and furnishing them with adequate supplies of nutritive food. Early and judicious treatment, Mr. Aylton stated. should save three-fourths of any properly kept stock attacked by flukes. The losses, he believes, largely depend u on povert, and upon trouble and expense being grudged) in the ord'nary management, and in the earlier stages of the attack._ WARWICISHIRE farmers have experienced large losses amongst flocks on flooded lands along the banks of the Tame in the north, and the Avon and Alne in the south, as well as on the poor elevated land about Birmingham, on the coal measures and magnesian limestone between the Midland metropolis and Nuneaton, and on the tenacious lias which occupies the south-eastern third...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 100g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236974433
  • 9781236974433