Little Journeys to the Homes of Great Reformers; John Wesley. Henry George. Garibaldi. Richard Cobden. Thomas Paine. John Knox

Little Journeys to the Homes of Great Reformers; John Wesley. Henry George. Garibaldi. Richard Cobden. Thomas Paine. John Knox

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1907 edition. Excerpt: ...being for spearing purposes. Oliver's mother sent him a baize or bombazine tablecloth. And this table-cloth he did cut up, prompted by the devil, into stockings, for he was justly proud of his calves, the same having been admired by the co-eds of Cambridge. For all of these things, in after years, Oliver did pray forgiveness and beseech pardon for such pride of the eye and lust of the flesh, manifest in pedal millinery. A year at Cambridge proved the uselessness of the place, but it was necessary to go there to find this out - The death of his father brought matters to a climax and Oliver must prepare for very hard times. Then London and a lawyer's office welcomed him. QOn Thursday, October 29, 1618, Cromwell saw a curious sight--it was the fall of the curtain in the fifth act of the life of Sir Walter Raleigh, who introduced tobacco into England, and did several other things, for which the monarchy was, as usual, ungrateful. Raleigh had sought to find an Eldorado for England, and alas! he only found that man must work wherever he is, if he would succeed, and that fields of gold and springs of eternal youth exist only in dreams, where they best belong. It was a cold grey morning and Sir Walter was kept standing on the scaffold while the headsman ground his ax, the delay being for the amusement and edification of the Christian friends assembled. "One thing I will never do," said Oliver Cromwell, law-clerk, swart and lusty, in green stockings and other sartor-resartus trifles, "One thing I will never do--and that is, take human life!" Oliver was both tender-hearted and grim. In London, Oliver married a wife, he being twentyone and three weeks over. The lady was the daughter of a client of the firm for which Oliver Cromwell...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 56 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 118g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236508580
  • 9781236508584