Literary Remains of King Edward the Sixth; Preface, Containing an Account of the Sources of the Work. Biographical Memoir. Appendix. Letters. Orationes. Exercises in the French Language. Poetry

Literary Remains of King Edward the Sixth; Preface, Containing an Account of the Sources of the Work. Biographical Memoir. Appendix. Letters. Orationes. Exercises in the French Language. Poetry

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1857 edition. Excerpt: ...an Italian who had accompanied Peter Martyr to England, writes as follows: The most godly Josiah, our earthly hope, died--the 6th of July--of consumption, as the physicians assert; by poison, according to common report, for this is rumoured by the papiste for the purpose of exciting a general hatred against Northumberland; nor, to tell the truth, were there wanting many and strong suspicions; but still, if I may say what I think, I believe the papiste themselves to have been the authors of so great wickedness, for they have expressed no signs of sorrow, and no inquiry has been made respecting so great a crime. (Zurich Letters, iii. 365.) Prejudiced writers revived this suspicion from time to time; among others, Osorius, bishop of Sylves in Portugal, in a letter written to Queen Elizabeth; to whom doctor Walter Haddon thus indignantly replied: Can you, being a Portugal born, so impudently defame our region with that horrible crime, without all likely or probable proof, now that twenty years be spent and gone, whereas no sober or discreet Englishman did ever conceive any such thought in his mind? The physicians reported that he died of a consumption; the same was affirmed by the grooms of his privy chamber, which did keep continual watch with the sick King. All his subjects did believe it for a confessed truth; neither could your slanderous fable have been blown abroad, but among tattling women, foolish children, and such malicious English losells like unto you. Nor yet could this rotten unsavoury cavil have had any discreet author, had it not been whispered into the ears of Osorius. (A Sight of the Portugall Pearle, translated into English by Abraham Hartwell. 1565. 8vo. p. 27.) The rumour had however been very widely diffused, as Bishop Cooper...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 254 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 13mm | 458g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236539141
  • 9781236539144