The Literary Digest Atlas of the New Europe and the Far East; Showing the New Countries and New Boundaries Resulting from the Great War and from the Treaties of Peace, with Explanatory Historical, Political and Economic Articles Prepared

The Literary Digest Atlas of the New Europe and the Far East; Showing the New Countries and New Boundaries Resulting from the Great War and from the Treaties of Peace, with Explanatory Historical, Political and Economic Articles Prepared

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1922 edition. Excerpt: ...eye if others take up the work after our refusal. We might have done it better, but we would not do it at all. British, French and Italian diplomats are going about it in the only way they know." An answer to these and harsher criticisms is supplied by Sirdar Ikbal Ali Shah, in The Contemporary Review (London). To turn these countries over on a basis of strict self-determination, he objects, "would not only give rise to local anarchy, but would constitute a direct challenge to a Bolshevik overflow from Persia.... To one who knows the East the chaos and disaster that would spread from British withdrawal would be all too plain." The passing of the Turk has not, in the view of most English, French and Italian authorities, made the dismembered portions of Turkey safe for democracy. "'Turkey' is, in a way, a misnomer," says a contemporary historian, discussing the former empire in one of the series of handbooks prepared under the direction of the British Foreign Office: "The old Turkey was not a country inhabited mainly by Turks, as Italy is inhabited by Italians, England by Englishmen, Spain by Spaniards, etc. As 'Austria' used to connote a congeries of non-Austrian races held together by a dynastic system, so Turkey, or the Ottoman Empire, stood for a number of non-Turkish races held together by the militarist and theocratic dynastic system of the Ottoman Sultanate. The Turkish language has no word for 'Turkey, ' which would properly be Turkestan, as Arabistan stands for Arabia. The Young Turks have endeavored to popularize the Levantine form, i. e., 'Turkia.' "The Turks, or Turanians, coming originally from Mongolia, spread westward through Turkestan and North Persia, until, in the tenth century, the Seljuk...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 36 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236894901
  • 9781236894908