A Literal English Translation of King Alfred's Anglo-Saxon Version of the Compendious History of the World by Paul Orosius; By Jos Bosworth. Containing, Facsimile Specimens of the Lauderdale and Cotton Mss. an Introduction on Orosius and

A Literal English Translation of King Alfred's Anglo-Saxon Version of the Compendious History of the World by Paul Orosius; By Jos Bosworth. Containing, Facsimile Specimens of the Lauderdale and Cotton Mss. an Introduction on Orosius and

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1855 edition. Excerpt: ...against the Tarentines; and so fully did they levy their forces, that even the proletarii' were not allowed to stay at home. Those were they, whom they left that their wives might have children, when they went to war. They said, it seemed to them wiser, that they should not lose those who could go out, whoever might have children. The Romans then went against the Tarentines, and laid all waste where they came, and stormed many towns. 3. Then the Tarentines sent everywhere for help, where they could hope for any. Pyrrhus, king of Epirus, came to them with the greatest force, as well in infantry, and in cavalry, as with a. fleet. In those days, he was famous above all other kings, as well for his great forces, and for his forethought, as for his knowledge of war. Pyrrhus assisted the Tarentines, because the city Tarentum was built by the Lacedaemonians, who then belonged to his kingdom. He had the Thessalians and Macedonians to help him, and in that battle, he had with him twenty elephants, --animals which the Romans never saw before. He was the man, that first brought them into Italy. He was also, in those days, most skilful in warfare and in contest; but in this only, his gods and his idolatry, which he followed, deceived him. When he inquired of his gods, which should have victory over the other, --he over the Romans, or the Romans over him, they answered him ambiguously and said;--" Thou shalt have it, or shalt not.""--The first battle, that he had with the Romans, was in Lucania, near the river which is called Siris. After there had been great slaughter on both sides, Pyrrhus ordered the elephants to be brought into the battle. When the Romans saw that such a stratagem was employed against them, as they had never...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 106 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 204g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236955870
  • 9781236955876