The Lincoln Centenary in Literature; Selections from the Principal Magazines of February and March, 1909, Together with a Few from 1907-1908 Volume 2

The Lincoln Centenary in Literature; Selections from the Principal Magazines of February and March, 1909, Together with a Few from 1907-1908 Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1909 edition. Excerpt: ... PRESIDENT SAD AND IHPRESSIVE SCBNI-J--I-.UNERAL SERVICES OVER THE asmms or PRESIDENT LINCOLN AS THEY LAY IN STATE IN THE EAST LINCOLN 331-3A'lm-31) mg 1,531., . ROOM OF THE WHITE HOUSE, APRIL 19TH, 1865. LESLIE'S WEEKLY The Man Lincoln As Notable Men Saw Him. delegates to the national convention. I lived at Tuscola, and, with aparty of Republicans, drove across the prairies to Decatur to attend the convention. The distance was about forty miles, and we traveled in a two-horse farm wagon. When we drove into Decatur and through the main street, one of our party, a man by the name of Vanderon, said, " There's Abe!" and called out to atall man on the sidewalk, " Howdy, Abe I" to which Mr. Lincoln responded, with like familiarity, " Howdy, Areh!" A little later one of our party wanted to send a telegram, and we went to the railroad station, where the only telegraph office in the town was located. There we met Mr. Lincoln, and Mr. Vanderon expressed surprise at seeing him, and asked if he had come to the convention, being a candidate for President. Lincoln looked at his questioner for a moment, and then, with a drawl, replied, " I'm most too much of a candidate to he here, and not enough of one to stay away." The convention was held the next day, in what was called a wigwam, though it would hardly be called that now. It was an open space or lot between two buildings. Posts made from saplings had been set into the ground at the open ends of the lot, so as to form a support for a roof of green boughs to serve as a shade, and rough boards were placed on short lengths of logs to form the seats. The two ends were open. The convention was practically out of doors. I went to the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 78 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 154g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123684954X
  • 9781236849540