The Life, Speeches, and Public Services of John Bell; Together with a Sketch of the Life of Edward Everett, Union Candidate for the Offices of Preside

The Life, Speeches, and Public Services of John Bell; Together with a Sketch of the Life of Edward Everett, Union Candidate for the Offices of Preside

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1860 edition. Excerpt: ...every one hundred, or four hundred, or five hundred miles you advance with it, suppose it stops there, is so much space overcome and gained in the transit between the Atlantic States and the Pacific Coast. You shorten the land transportation, you shorten the transportation of troops and munitions of war by that much. The expense and labor are not lost. The honorable Senator's argument is a failure when he attempts to show that if we cannot accomplish all we propose, all is lost. Every hundred miles we proceed with the railroad is so much gained. But to recur to the history of this project. "The Senator from South Carolina says the project is premature. Five years ago, I believe, we ratified in this body the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. Then, if the Senator had anything to object to making inroads upon the Constitution of the land in this age of progress, then was the time for him to come forward with his objections. But from the moment that treaty was ratified, and California became ours by a stronger and more imperative necessity than existed before, when we had only Oregon, it was settled that we were to keep up with this progress, and connect the Atlantic and Pacific together. It was then as inevitable as is now the necessity of making this road, to my mind, and I think it will be to every other Senator who will consider it for a moment calmly and without prejudice. We must have this tie, this bond, this channel of communication, if we mean to hold the territory which was ceded to us by that treaty. And, Sir, for fear I shall forget it, let me now, although it is not strictly in the order of my remarks, call the Senator's attention to another point in answer to one part of his argument in which he complains of the infraction of the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 32 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 77g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236525558
  • 9781236525550