Life and Speeches of Daniel O'Connell; Including Many Speeches Not in Other Collections

Life and Speeches of Daniel O'Connell; Including Many Speeches Not in Other Collections

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1872 edition. Excerpt: ... there were one or two points more on which _I would say a word. The bill which the Lords had rejected was accompanied part of the way in the other House, with two measures called its wings. Those measures were condemned by some who were friendly to the great question; but the Catholics of Ireland were not the authors of those measures; they were no party to their origin. Of that bill which went to make a provision for the Catholic clergy I would say, that the clergy desired no such provision. They are content to serve their flocks for the humble pittance which they now receive. The rewards to which they looked for their incessant and valuable labors, are--let every hair of the Bishop of Chester s wig stand on end at hearing it--not of this but of another world. It is not the Catholics who desire those measures. They are sought for by the Protestants, who look upon them as some sort of security; and the Catholics are disposed to make some sacrifice to honest prejudices, by acceding to that which they did not approve. It was this feeling which produced those measures, and brought on that ridiculous scene of one of his Majesty s ministers strongly objecting to the wings, while another was eagerly flapping them on, until, like the tomb of Mahomet, the Catholic bill hung suspended between the two counteracting influences. As to the second bill, respecting the forty shilling freeholders, it is one which I cannot approve. I am too much of a reformer, and of that class called radical, to wish for any such alteration. I did assent to it only because it was considered that Protestants desired it. I would much rather have emancipation without it. They are now, however, gone by, and I hope they will never again make...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 96 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 186g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236587596
  • 9781236587596