The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D., Comprehending an Account of His Studies and Numerous Works, in Chronological Order; A Series of His Epistolary Correspondence and Conversations with Many Eminent Persons; And Various Original Volume 4

The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D., Comprehending an Account of His Studies and Numerous Works, in Chronological Order; A Series of His Epistolary Correspondence and Conversations with Many Eminent Persons; And Various Original Volume 4

By (author) 

List price: US$16.70

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1824 edition. Excerpt: ..." What! avowO, no, sir, a vow is a horrible thing; it is a snare for sin. The man who cannot go to heaven without a vow--may go--" Here, standing erect, in the middle of his library, and rolling grand, his pause was truly acurious compound of the solemn and the ludicrous; he halfwhistled in his usual way, _ when pleasant, and he paused, as if checked by religious awe.--Methought he would have ad_ded--to Hell--but was restrained. I humoured the dilemma. "What! sir (said I), 'In cwlumjusseris ibit.9' " alluding to his imitation of it, " And bid him go to Hell, to Hell he goes." lhad mentioned to him a slight fault in his noble "Imitation of the Tenth Satire of J uvenal," a too near recurrence of the verb spread, in his description of the young Enthusiast at College: " Through all his veins the fever of renown, Spread: from the strong contagion of the gown; 0'er Bodley's dome his future labours spread, And Bacon' mansion trembles o'er his head." He had desired me to change spreads to burns, but for perfect authenticity, I now had it done with his own hand.i I thought this alteration not only cured the fault, but was more poetical, as-it might carry an allusion to the shirtby which Hercules was inflamed. We had a quiet comfortable meeting at Mr. Dilly's; nobody there but ourselves. Mr. Dilly mentioned somebody having wished that Milton's " Tractate on Education" should 'be printed along with his Poems in the edition of the English Poets then going on. JoausoN. " It would be breaking in upon the plan; but would be of no great consequence. So far asit would be any thing, it would be wrong. Education in England has been...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 116 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 222g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123691807X
  • 9781236918079