Life and Public Services of Major-General Meade (George Gordon Meade); The Hero of Gettysburg, and Commander of the Army of the Potomac

Life and Public Services of Major-General Meade (George Gordon Meade); The Hero of Gettysburg, and Commander of the Army of the Potomac

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1864 edition. Excerpt: ...to be satisfied with the success he had accomplished, desisting from any further attack this day.. "About seven o'clock r.u. Major-General Slocum and Sickles, with the Twelfth corps and part of the Third, reached the ground and took post on the right and left of the troops previously posted. Being satisfied, from reports received from the field, that it was the intention of the enemy to support, with his whole army, the attack already made, and reports from MajorGenerals Hancock and Howard on the character of the position being favorable, I determined to give battle at this point, and early in the evening first issued orders to all corps to collectitrate at Gettysburg, directing all trains to be sent to the rear at Westminster at eleven run. first. "I broke up my head-quarters, which till then had been at Taneytown, and proceeded to the field, arriving there at one AA!of the second. So soon as it was light I proceeded to inspect the position occupied, and to make arrangements for posting several corps as they should reach the ground. " By seven 4.21. the Second and Fifth corps, with the rest of the Third, had reached the ground, and were posted as follows: The Eleventh corps retained its position on Cemetery ridge, just opposite to the town; the First corps was posted on the right; the Eleventh on an elevated knoll connecting with the ridge and extending to the south and east, on which the Twelfth corps was placed. the right of the Twelfth corps resting on a small stream at a point where it crossedythe Baltimore pike, and which formed on the right flank of the Twelfth something of an obstacle. "Cemetery ridge extended in a westerly and southerly direction, gradual diminishing in elevation till it came to a...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236785371
  • 9781236785374