The Life of Napoleon Bonaparte, Once Emperor of the French, Who Died in Exile, at St. Helena, After a Captivity of Six Years' Duration

The Life of Napoleon Bonaparte, Once Emperor of the French, Who Died in Exile, at St. Helena, After a Captivity of Six Years' Duration

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1841 edition. Excerpt: ...their simplicity, perspicuity, and justice, now generally known as "The Code Napoleon," and as generally allowed to possess intrinsic merit. The marked good sense of his observations, the soundness of his suggestions, the convincing arguments by which they were upheld, were the admiration of every one. The administrative act, in which the Chief Consul met with the most strenuous resistance, that to which he found it most difficult to reconcile, either the party he meant to benefit, or those who, on most other occasions, were ready to second his views, was that by which the Romish religion was finally established as the national faith. After the battle of Marengo, the papal dominions had been spared, to the evident surprise, as well as the displeasure, of the soldiery: and, 18th September, 1802, a treaty was signed, after long protracted discussions, between the Holy Father and the Consular Government. Whenever any violent stretch of power has been contemplated, it has been a common practice to call in the aid of the priesthood; the reason is obvious, the clergy have ever been found the most pliable, as well as the most convenient tools, in the establishment of measures subversive of public liberty: their known influence over the human mind, enables them to lend powerful assistance to arbitrary government; while the usual bias of their disposition is towards irresponsible despotic rule. Of the value of such instruments, Napoleon was perfectly aware: desirous to conciliate them to his own views, he had re-opened the churches in France; he was now prepared to take another step on the same road, as a prudent means to the attaintment of that, which, if it had not in the commencement of his career been his object, had latterly been the great...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 382 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 20mm | 680g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236650050
  • 9781236650054