The Life and Life-Work of Beharmji M. Malabari; Being a Biographical Sketch, with Selections from His Writings and Speeches on Infant Marriage and Enforced Widowhood, and Also His "Rambles of a Pilgrim Reformer"

The Life and Life-Work of Beharmji M. Malabari; Being a Biographical Sketch, with Selections from His Writings and Speeches on Infant Marriage and Enforced Widowhood, and Also His "Rambles of a Pilgrim Reformer"

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1888 edition. Excerpt: ...(I1) She depends upon man in all concerns of life and is nota free agent; for food, clothing, housing, for everything she is at the mercy of man. (0) This being so, it is very easy for man to betray the poor creature. The result is bodily and mental torture to her, now and then untimely death. If she survives the crisis, she has to commit or connive at infanticide; she then becomes answerable to law. Neither Caste nor Law holds anybody.else responsible. Woman is the only sufferer throughout. The man, who is ten times more guilty than the woman (even granting she is guilty), goes free. He has no bodily or mental agony to suffer, and the law or the Caste can do nothing to him, although he may be known as the father of the child. " 6. Then, look at the pitiable condition of the widow. She is condemned to an unnatural life of starvation all round. And when she tries to obtain that for which her nature hungers and thirsts, she is hounded by society and the StateThe Government provides food even for a criminal. Does it lnow ' 118-I1 many 8. poor widow goes without food and clothing, and is often compelled to sell herself for the necessaries of life? How is it that all Castes do not make provision for destitute widows? " Such is a substance of Mr. Nathubhai's views, for wliiCll he is responsible, and which I have tried to place before the reader as mildly as I could. "A HINDU LADY "-AND HER WOES. "A Hindu Lady," Isee, has not escaped the charge of " exaggeration" from her male-assailants. How could she, poor thing? That is the only "argument" behind which the benevolent let-'-'alone-ist can shield himself. Such and such social evil has been over-painted; therefore the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 148 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 277g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236873351
  • 9781236873354