The Life and Letters of Sire George Savile Bart

The Life and Letters of Sire George Savile Bart

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1898 edition. Excerpt: ...once one amongst us. The King can do no hurt, no injustice; Counsellors and Judges must answer for what is done.... We go not about to take away life or limb, nor to try a man... here is a Council that has ruined you... and I wonder for what single virtue they have so many friends.' Lord Cavendish: ' I stand not up to speak for Lord Halifax, though I confess obligation to him, and will return it, when I am in a fit capacity, in another Place.' (This Vote) ' is a severe censure, or rather a punishment; but it does not appear to me that it is true that Lord Halifax advised this Answer Is not for common fame '. Is Halifax so absolute a Minister? 3... Halifax might give ill Counsels, but not this ill Counsel' Moves that ill councillors may be removed, but to do it in a more Parliamentary way' and cannot agree to the Question. Mr. Harbord: '... Some of Lord Halifax's relations would have persuaded him to vindicate himself by retiring from public Employment, and that would have been something; but till that be done, I would give him no quarter.' 3 Burnet probably refers to this debate when he says: ' Some called Lord Halifax a papist: others said he was 1 Added in Hist. MSS. Com. Rep. xii., part 9, p. 118 (Beaufort MSS.). 2 Or, ' Is the Lord Hallifax the onely man?' (ibid.). 1 The following sentence apparently relates to Mr. Hyde. an atheist. Chichley, that had married his mother, 16 ? moved, that I might be sent for to satisfy the house as to the truth of his religion. I wish, ' adds the Doctor, ' I could have said as much to have persuaded them that he was a good Christian, as that he was no papist.'1 The House eventually resolved--(1) To insist on the Exclusion. (2) To refuse Supply in the meantime. (3) That the advisers of the '...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 258 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 14mm | 467g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236756940
  • 9781236756947