Life and Letters of Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker O.M., G.C.S.I.: Volume 1

Life and Letters of Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker O.M., G.C.S.I.: Volume 1

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Description

Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817-1911) was one of the most eminent botanists of the later nineteenth century. Educated at Glasgow, he developed his studies of plant life by examining specimens all over the world. After several successful scientific expeditions, first to the Antarctic and later to India, he was appointed to succeed his father as Director of the Botanical Gardens at Kew. Hooker was the first to hear of and support Charles Darwin's theory of natural selection, and over their long friendship the two scientists exchanged many letters. Another close friend was the scientist T. H. Huxley, and it was the latter's son, Leonard (1860-1933), who published this standard biography in 1918. The first volume describes Hooker's early life and his career up to 1860. It includes many letters to Darwin as the two men discussed the new theories and the publication of On the Origin of Species.show more

Product details

  • Electronic book text
  • CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
  • Cambridge University Press (Virtual Publishing)
  • Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • 4 b/w illus. 1 map
  • 1139014536
  • 9781139014533

Table of contents

Preface; 1. Early days; 2. The Antarctic voyage: preliminaries; 3. The southern journey and its scientific scope; 4. The voyage of the Erebus and Terror: passing impressions; 5. Tasmania and the Antarctic; 6. South again: New Zealand and the Cape; 7. The Antarctic voyage: personal; 8. Return to England: and visit to Paris; 9. Edinburgh; 10. The Geological Survey; 11. The voyage to India; 12. Journey to the Kymore Hills; 13. To Darjiling: the first Himalayan journey; 14. The second Himalayan journey; 15. Captivity and release; 16. Last days in Sikkim; 17. To the Khasia Mountains; 18. The return from India; 19. Botany: its position and prospects in the fifties; 20. Science teaching: examinations; 21. Science organisation: societies, journals, and rewards; 22. Miscellaneous, 1850-60; 23. Letters to Darwin, 1843-59; 24. On species; 25. The making of the 'Origin': science and friendship; 26. Publication of the 'Origin' and the 'Introduction to the Tasmanian Flora'; 27. The journey to Palestine and the work of 1860.show more