The Life of Joseph Garibaldi, the Liberator of Italy; Complete Up to the Withdrawal of Garibaldi to His Island Home After the Neapolitan Campaign, 1860

The Life of Joseph Garibaldi, the Liberator of Italy; Complete Up to the Withdrawal of Garibaldi to His Island Home After the Neapolitan Campaign, 1860

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1860 edition. Excerpt: ...the general, recognizing the voice of the admiral. "A light!" replied the startled Anita; "what shall I light, my dear? Don't you remember there is not money enough in the house to buy a candle?" "Ay, ay!" laughed the husband, as he opened the inner door to show the admiral tue way to the family hearth. "This way, admiral, if you please; be careful of your shins. There, on your left, is my Anita; against the wall my children are sleeping; on this side is a chair; now he seated." The admiral laughed heartily at this blind reception. "Admiral," continued Garibaldi, " when I agreed with Government for rations, I neglected to specify candles. So, as Government has paid me no money, I have no caudles." But the interview was none the less agreeable for all that; and the admiral left after a halfhour's visit greatly delighted. Proceeding to the-place of General Pacheo y Obes, then minister of war to the republic, he related the story of the interview in the darkness. The minister was surprised at the relation, and immediately sent one hundred patagons (dollars) to Garibaldi. The money was taken by the chief, kindly, but the next morning it was all distributed among the widows and children of the legionaries, --only reserving for himself enough to purchase a pound of candles, which Anita was specially charged to keep for occasions of evening visits from eminent persons. This generosity was a very inconvenient virtue at times. One day, finding one of the legionaries shirtless, he took the poor fellow into a retired place, where, stripping otf his own shirt, he placed it on the back of the destitute comrade in arms. His poncho hid the state of his own body until he got home. Appealing to Anita for...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 38 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 86g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236502663
  • 9781236502667