The Life of John Colborne, Field-Marshal Lord Seaton; . . Compiled from His Letters, Records of His Conversations, and Other Sources

The Life of John Colborne, Field-Marshal Lord Seaton; . . Compiled from His Letters, Records of His Conversations, and Other Sources

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1903 edition. Excerpt: ...these consisted of the 2nd Battalions of the 1st Chasseurs, 2nd Grenadiers and 2nd Chasseurs. Petit seems to put only two battalions here, the 2nd Battalions of the ist Chasseurs and 3rd Grenadiers. Colborne's first care next morning was to send back a strong party of the 52 nd to remove the wounded of the regiment, an attention which was not bestowed on those of the army generally, a large portion of them remaining on the field the second day after the battle. Captain Yonge thus comments on the story which has been told: "The action which has been related is for several reasons worthy of particular notice. First--the wheeling of a battalion in line, though under such circumstances the only practicable mode of changing front, was altogether unprecedented; just one of those promptings of inspiration that mark the mind of a great general. Executed amid a continual roar of artillery that rendered words of command inaudible, trusting chiefly to the further companies that they would be guided by the touch to their inward flank, it could hardly have been ventured at all but for the previous precaution of the commanding officer, who, when the order was given by the Duke that all the regiments in the centre should form four deep, rather than loosen his files by that formation, had preferred to double his line by placing one wing closed up in rear of the other; another instance to show how the knowledge of details and constant attention to them are essential in order to enable an officer to apply his men to the best purpose. Second.--That owing to the skill with which the movement was made, seizing the very acme of time, never, perhaps, was more signal service done by a body of troops so disproportionate in number to the force attacked; that...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 130 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 245g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236981790
  • 9781236981790