The Life and Exploits of the Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote de La Manche,1

The Life and Exploits of the Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote de La Manche,1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1788 edition. Excerpt: ...it were, in pursuit you, this vast tempest of packflaves, which has discharged itself upon our shoulders? ' ' Thine, 'St The LIFE and EXPLOITS' of Thine, Sancho, replied Don Qgixote, should, one would think, be used to such storms; but mine, that _were brought up between muflins and cambricks, must needs be more sensible of the griefofthis mishap. And were it not that I imagine (do I say imagine 3) did I not know for certain, that all these inconveniencies are inseparably annexed to the profeflion of arms, 'I would suffer myself to diehere out of pure vexation. To this replied the squire: Sir, fince these mishapa are the genuine fruits and harvefls of chivalry, pray tell me whether they fall out often, or whether they have their set times in which they happen; for, to any thinking, two more such harvests will disable us from ever reaping a third, if God of his insinite mercy does not succour us. Learn, friend Sancho, answered Don Qgixote, that the life of knights-errant is subject to a thousand perils and niishaps: but then they are every wbit as neat becoming kings and emperors; and this experience hath shewn us in many and divers knights, whose histories I am perfectly acquainted with. Icould tell you now, if the pain would give me leave, of some, who, by the strength of their arm alone, have mounted to the high degrees I have mentioned; and these very men were, before and after, involved in sundry calamities and misfortunes. For the valorous Amadis de Gaul saw himselfin the power of his mortal enemy, Archelaus the enchanter, ofwhom itis' positively affirmed, that, when he had him prisoner, he gave him ssabove two hundred lashes with his horse's bridle, after he had tied him toa pillar in his court-yard. And moreover there is a private...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 104 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 200g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123681102X
  • 9781236811028