The Life and Dying Declaration of Martin Richard Kehoe (as Written by Himself, ) Who Suffered the Extreme Penalty of the Law, by Hanging at Toronto Jail, Monday, December 4th, 1854, for the Alleged Murder of His Wife Ellen Kehoe (Classic Reprint)

The Life and Dying Declaration of Martin Richard Kehoe (as Written by Himself, ) Who Suffered the Extreme Penalty of the Law, by Hanging at Toronto Jail, Monday, December 4th, 1854, for the Alleged Murder of His Wife Ellen Kehoe (Classic Reprint)

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Excerpt from The Life and Dying Declaration of Martin Richard Kehoe (as Written by Himself, ) Who Suffered the Extreme Penalty of the Law, by Hanging at Toronto Jail, Monday, December 4th, 1854, for the Alleged Murder of His Wife Ellen Kehoe My parents were from the Province of Leinster, Ireland. My father, being a non-commissioned oiiieer in His Majesty's ser vice, was stationed at Hull, which was the cause of my birth there. After some time, his regiment was ordered to Ireland, and in the year 1821, which time is the nearest I can remem ber, I find my father appointed a staff-sergeant stationed at Carlow, and keeping tavern, as men attached to the staff are not obliged to reside in barracks. I was then nine years old, and going to school; as my father, being a good and pious man, Was determined that all his children should have a regular share of education. I was a wild boy in my juvenile days, but much brighter with regard to intellect than the younger mem bers of our family. When I was considered inclined to take a trade, I was sent to the metropolitan city, Dublin, where I was apprenticed, in the year 1830, to learn the art of a boot and shoe maker, as in Dublin there are in all branches of trade good mechanics in general. This was my parent's idea of sending me there. Having had a good taste for my trade, I made won derful progress at it; and although Dublin is a place where boys have on Opportunity of mis-spending their time, I must admit that, even at the age of twenty, I was of a retired dis position. Wishing to mix with little society, my mind appeared to be much upon my work. Having served tire years, and my time being up, I received my indenture and with only one exception, I never fell out. With my master during my apprenticeship. The day I was out of my time, I sailed for Liverpool. Being a young traveller, I found the passage a very severe one. I thought, had I been on shore again I would not mind tramping across the deep Waters of the sea, at least until the beautiful summer's sun Would set in; although being a perfect stranger, and it raining torrents from the heavens, I soon found a friend when I landed, although I was not looking at the time for one but our blessed Lord always sends some good person to direct the stranger on the right road, particularly when applied for in a proper way. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 42 pages
  • 152 x 229 x 2mm | 68g
  • Forgotten Books
  • United States
  • English
  • , black & white illustrations
  • 0243286260
  • 9780243286263