The Life and Correspondence of John Foster; With Notices of Mr. Foster as a Preacher and a Companion by John Sheppard Volume 1

The Life and Correspondence of John Foster; With Notices of Mr. Foster as a Preacher and a Companion by John Sheppard Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1846 edition. Excerpt: ...the main weight of the service, and who, he thinks, can do it better than any one else. Strange inconsideration. 792. I observe that all animals recognise each other in the face, as instinctively conscious that there the being is peculiarly present. What a mysterious sentiment there is in one's recognition of a conscious being in the eye that looks at one, and emphatically if it have some peculiar significance with respect to one's self. A very striking feeling is caused by the opening on one of the eyes of any considerable animal, if it instantly have the expression of meaning. While the eye is shut, the being seems not so completely with us, as when it looks through the opened organ. It is like holding in our hand a letter which we believe to contain most interesting meanings, but the seal secludes them from us. 793. A very respectable widow, who lost her husband ten or twelve years since, told me that even now the last image of her husband, as she saw him ill, delirious and near death, generally first presents himself when she recollects him. I always think I would not choose to see a dear friend dead, because probably the last image would be the most prompt to remembrance, and I should be sorry to have the dead image presented to me rather than the living. 794. It is a great sin against moral taste to mention ludicrously, or for ludicrous comparison, circumstances in the animal world which are painful or distressing to the animals that are in them. The simile, "Like a toad under a harrow," has been introduced in a way to excite a smile at the kind of human distress described, and perhaps that human distress might be truly ludicrous, for many such distresses there are among human beings; but then we should never assume as a parallel...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 150 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 281g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236615514
  • 9781236615510