Lieutenant-General John Burgoyne and the Convention of Saratoga One Hundred Years Ago. a Paper Read Before the American Antiquarian Society on the 22d of October, 1877

Lieutenant-General John Burgoyne and the Convention of Saratoga One Hundred Years Ago. a Paper Read Before the American Antiquarian Society on the 22d of October, 1877

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1878 edition. Excerpt: ...this I will cite a passage from the examination of Lieut.-Col. Kingston, before the House of Commons, in Burgoyne's "State of the Expedition," &c., page 91. Kingston assisted in making the Convention on the part of the British: Q. Was it by consent of Gen'l Gates that the soldiers after the Convention retained their Cartouch boxes? A. They retained their belts, and I really don't recollect whether their cartouch-boxes were in general retained or not; but talking with Mr. Gates when the King's troops marched by with the accoutrements on, Mr. Gates asked me (we had been old acquaintance formerly) whether it was not customary on field days for arms and accoutrements to go together. I told him there was nothing said in the Convention that I had agreed to with him relating to the accoutrements, and that be could have no right to anything but what was stipulated in that treaty. He replied, "You are perfectly right," and turned to some of the officers in their service by, and said, "If we meant to have had them, we ought to have inserted them in the Convention." That General Gates consented to the Convention soldiers taking away their accoutrements, is further confirmed by the testimony of Lieutenant Noble, acting Aid-de-Camp to Major-General Phillips: "In the course of conversation, at Saratoga, October 17, 1777, I heard Major-General Gates say that he did not mean to injure private property; and as the Colonels would. suffer by the loss of their accoutrements, the soldiers might take them. I was the officer sent to the commanding officers to tell them the soldiers were to keep their accoutrements. They had taken them ofi' with a design to leave them behind, and upon my delivering the message they put them on...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 30 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 73g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236652185
  • 9781236652188