A Library of Universal Literature, in Four Parts; Comprising Science, Biography, Fiction and the Great Orations. Part Three

A Library of Universal Literature, in Four Parts; Comprising Science, Biography, Fiction and the Great Orations. Part Three : Orations Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1900 edition. Excerpt: ...conduct; but observing and considering I find, that in the beginning, when certain persons drove away the Olynthians who desired a conference with us, he gained over our simplicity by engaging to surrender Amphipolis, and to execute the secret article' once so famous; afterward he got the friendship of the Olynthians, by taking Potidaea from you, wronging you his former allies, and delivering it to them; and lastly now the Thessalians, by promising to surrender Magnesia, and undertake the Phocian war on their behalf. In short, none who have dealt with him has he not deceived. He has risen by conciliating and cajoling the weakness of every people in turn who knew him not. As, therefore, by such means he rose, when every people imagined he would advance their interest, so ought he by the same means to be pulled down again, when the selfish aim of his whole policy is exposed. To this crisis, O Athenians, are Philip's affairs come; or let any man stand forward and prove to me, or rather to you, that my assertions are false, or that men whom Philip has once overreached will trust him hereafter, or that the Thessalians who have been degraded into servitude would not gladly become free. 1 In this assembly, by the contrivance of venal craters, or through the supineness of the people. In the first Philippic there is a more pointed allusion to the practice of Philip's adherents, who are charged with sending him secret intelligence of what passed at home. Such men as Aristodemus, Neoptolemus, perhaps Demades and others are referred to../Eschines had not yet begun to be a friend of Philip.? A secret intrigue was carried on between Philip and the Athenians, by which he engaged to put Amphipolis in their hands, but on the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 130 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 245g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236761235
  • 9781236761231