Library of Universal Knowledge; A Reprint of the Last (1880) Edinburgh and London Edition of Chambers's Encyclopaedia, with Copious Additions by American Authors Volume 5

Library of Universal Knowledge; A Reprint of the Last (1880) Edinburgh and London Edition of Chambers's Encyclopaedia, with Copious Additions by American Authors Volume 5

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1880 edition. Excerpt: ...the sacred Scriptures were translated into English, several of the leading men of the time, such as Aldhelm, Bede, and Alfred, lending their assistance. Sermons and grammars, glossaries and medical treatises, geographies and dialogues between Solomon and Saturn, make up the file of this period of the literature. 2. The Period extending from the Norman Conquest to the English Beformation.--The conquest had the effect of changing the language of the court, the schools, and the tribunals of justice; it took but little effect on the native inhabitants. In a few centuries, owing partly to the obstinacy with which the English people clung to their mothertongue, and partly to the circumstance that long settlement in England and political antagonism to Fi ance had practically changed the descendants of the Norman conquerors into English nobles, and inspired them with English feelings, the latter began to English.-abandon the use of French. "In 1849, boys ceased to learn their Latin through the medium of this tongue; and in 1363 (the 86th year of Edward III.), it was directed by act of parliament that all pleadings in the law-courts should henceforth be conducted in English, because, as is stated in the preamble to the act, French was become much unknown in the realm " (Morris's Historical Outlines of English Accidence, 1872). In a generation or two after the conquest, classical and theological learning made very considerable progress. Monasteries were busy, and the English universities were both by this time founded; while an interchange of teachers and pupils constantly went on between the English seminaries and those of France and other countries. Lanfranc and Anselm, Hales and Duns Scotus, Michael Scot and Roger Bacon, had attained...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 42mm | 1,456g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123678362X
  • 9781236783622