Liberating Cyberspace

Liberating Cyberspace : Civil Liberties, Human Rights & the Internet

Edited by 

List price: US$104.00

Currently unavailable

We can notify you when this item is back in stock

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

Does the exponential growth of the Internet really mark a revolution in human interaction and communication, providing truly democratic access to information and ideas? Or, compounded by a growing number of competing interests now arguing for the introduction of more rigorous controls, will the full potential of the Internet fail to be recognised?Liberating Cyberspace is the first volume to assess the impact of the Internet on our basic civil rights. Addressing the key questions, contributors from Britain and the United States examine a range of topics, from copyright and encryption to free speech, privacy and freedom of information. A series of critical case studies considers the potential of the Internet for promoting international women's rights, its the role in the McLibel trial, and to what extent the Internet can or should create new copyright and property laws of its own. Controversial and topical, Liberating Cyberspace sheds valuable new light on some of the fundamental issues of modern global communication.show more

Product details

  • Hardback | 304 pages
  • 146.05 x 228.6 x 25.4mm | 453.59g
  • PLUTO PRESS
  • London, United Kingdom
  • English
  • 0745312993
  • 9780745312996

Review quote

'The various contributions focus on civil liberties and freedom of expression ... This combination of thematic chapters with specific case-studies works well' -- International Affairsshow more

About Liberty

Ziauddin Sardar is Visiting Professor of Science Policy at Middlesex University and consulting editor of the prestigious journal Futures. He is a prolific writer and is the author of Cultural Studies for Beginners, Barbaric Others: A Manifesto on Western Racism and editor, with Jerome Ravetz, of Cyberfutures: Culture and Politics on the Information Superhighway.show more

Table of contents

Acknowledgements Introduction PART 1: Freedoms of Expression and Information, Privacy, and Copyright 1. Freedom of Expression: Censorship in Private Hands Adam Newey (Index on Censorship) 2. Freedom of Information: An Electronic Window onto Government Andrew Ecclestone (Campaign for Freedom of Information) 3. Liberty on the Line Simon Davies (London School of Economics) & Ian Hosein 4. Cryptography and Democracy: Dilemmas of Freedom Caspar Bowden (Scientists for Labour) & Yaman Akdeniz (University of Leeds) 5. Copyright, Civil Rights and the Internet Nick Braithwaite (lawyer, Clifford Chance) 6. Copyright and the Internet Charles Oppenheim (De Montfort University) PART 2: Case Studies 7. European Policy on Regulation and Content on the Internet Penny Campbell ( European Institute for the Media, Dusseldorf) and Emmanuelle Machet 8. Political Participation and the Internet Cathy Bryan & James Tatam (both Informed Sources Intonational) 9. The Net Out Of Control - A New Moral Panic: Censorship and Sexuality, Angus Hamilton (lawyer) 10. AVIVA: The Women's International Listings Magazine On the Internet Kate Burke (AVIVA) 11. Women and the Internet Clem Herman (Soft Solution/Poptel) 12. Tinysex and Gender Troubles Sherry Turkle (MIT) 13. The Governance of Cyberspace: Racism on the Internet David Capitanchik (Aberdeen College) & Michael Whine (Board of Deputies of British Jews) 14. McSpotlight: Freedom of Speech and the Internet Philip George (environmental campaigner) 15. Human Rights and the Internet Conor Foley (Amnesty International) Glossary of Internet Term Indexshow more