Lhasa; An Account of the Country and People of Central Tibet and of the Progress of the Mission Sent There by the English Government in the Year 1903-4 Volume 9

Lhasa; An Account of the Country and People of Central Tibet and of the Progress of the Mission Sent There by the English Government in the Year 1903-4 Volume 9

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1905 edition. Excerpt: ...little valley in which the monastery of Nyen de-kyi-buk hides itself. The ascent was easy between bushes of thorn and roses covered with a wealth of traveller's joy; we passed beside the usual chortens and through a gateway over which a peach-tree spangled the blue of the sky with pink and snow. There was another blossoming against the walls of the monastery half-way up the hill. A hundred yards further on we found the abbot and the "chanzi " of the community waiting to receive us. The Shebdung Lama, who had lived for many years across the valley, and must often have seen from his master's windows above the town and gompa the rockclinging monastery to which we had come, was really responsible for our visit. With the usual inability to recognise the things which really interest a traveller in a strange country he had, while insisting upon the interests and the beauty of the Sinchen Lama's home, only incidentally spoken of a small community across the valley where, he said, extreme self-mortification was practised by a small company of the Nying-ma sect. We left our ponies in the monk's care and went inside the temple. We were glad to escape the white and dazzling sunshine. There was instantly visible a curious distinction between the monks of Nyen-de-kyi-buk and those whom we had met elsewhere. With the exception of the officials of the monastery these recluses wear their hair long, not plaited into a pigtail, but allowed to fall almost loose over their shoulders in a matted and filthy tangle. But besides this, there was not very much to distinguish the lamasery from others in the valley. The abbot, a quiet, sad-eyed man of about forty, was shaven, as also were a dozen children playing about...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 86 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 168g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123694545X
  • 9781236945457