Lexilogus, Or, a Critical Examination of the Meaning and Etymology of Numerous Greek Words and Passages; Intended Principally for Homer and Hesiod

Lexilogus, Or, a Critical Examination of the Meaning and Etymology of Numerous Greek Words and Passages; Intended Principally for Homer and Hesiod

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1869 edition. Excerpt: ...that compound idea; and without hesitation I declare my preference of the other explanation found in the scholia, flute 1:6 xetlog enlfipmoav, c5'o're doxeiiv ed1: s'qJ8ou. 193 1'ypg5' which agrees precisely with Athenaaus 1, p. 13. d. If for instance a vessel be filled as full as possible, the liquor rises somewhat above the rim, and forms a kind of cover, or, if you will, a crown. Without now insisting particularly on this literal over-fulness, we can very well suppose that the expression emazeqasdiiaa, arising undoubtedly from this appearance, may have passed over into a common hyperbolical expression for complete /ulness. But still we must not forget the context in Athcnaeus; xal mi?-ca fiarpadeov (i. e. they filled the vessel in the manner before described above the brim) rrpdg oian/017 rvfieasvot. 3. And here it is to be observed, that the older commentators and grammarians, the whole body of scholiasts----Apollonius, Hesychius, Suidas, Eustathius--agree in this explanation; and the other idea of the literal crowning of the wine is not mentioned by one, not even by Eustathius, who on other occasions has been very successful in hunting out false interpretations. For of the four glosses of Hesychius which refer to this expres Postquam prima quies epulis, mensaaque remotes, Crateras magnos statuunt et vina coronant. Vhich last verse is again given with a trifling alteration at lib. 7, 147., as Homer sometimes repeats his corresponding one. It was therefore very excusable if the old commentators, whom Servius had lying before him, expected to find the sense of the Homeric.s'azw-rs' /meflm, as we have given it above, not only in this passage of the 1Eueid (1, 723-), but also at 3, 525-Where it is said, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 212 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 386g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236983874
  • 9781236983879