Lex, Rex, Or, the Law and the Prince; A Dispute for the Just Prerogative of King and People, Containing the Reasons and Causes of the Most Necessary Defensive Wars of the Kingdom of Scotland and of Their Expedition for the Aid and Help of

Lex, Rex, Or, the Law and the Prince; A Dispute for the Just Prerogative of King and People, Containing the Reasons and Causes of the Most Necessary Defensive Wars of the Kingdom of Scotland and of Their Expedition for the Aid and Help of

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1843 edition. Excerpt: ...with obstinacy, and invincible by prayers, as is recorded of Nero, whose wish was rather a transported passion, than a fixed resolution. This cannot fall in the attempts of any but a madman. Now this cannot be proved our king; but though we grant in the foresaid case, that the community may resume their power, and rectify what is amiss, which we cannot grant; but this will follow by their doctrine, in every case of male administration.1 Ans.--The Prelate draweth me to speak of the case of the king's unjust murder, confessed (Psal. li.); to which I answer: He taketh it for confessed, that it had been treason in the sanhedrim or states of Israel to have taken on them to judge and punish David for his adultery and his murder; but he giveth no reason for this, nor any word of God; and truly, though I will not presume to go before others m this, God's law (Gen. ix. 6, compared with Num. xxxv. 30, 31) seemeth to say against them. 6. Nor can I think that God's law, or his deputy the judges, are to accept the persons of the great, because they are great; (Deut. i. 17; 2 Chron. xix. 6, 7;) and we say, we 1 Stolen from Arnisseus, de authorit. prin. c. 4, n. 5, p. 73. cannot distinguish where the law distinguisheth not. The Lord speaketh to under judges, (Lev. xix. 15, ) " Thou shalt not respect the person of the poor, nor honour the person of the mighty," or of the prince, for we know what these names Vl"lJl and $$3l meaneth. I grant it is not God's meaning that the king should draw the sword against himself, but yet it followeth not, that if we speak of the demerit of blood, that the law of God accepteth any judge, great or small; and if the estates be above the king, as I conceive they are, though it be a human politic constitution, that...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 222 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 404g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236637798
  • 9781236637796