Letters on the Unhealthy Condition of the Lower Class of Dwellings; Especially in Large Towns; Founded on the First Report of the Health of Towns Commission, with Notices of Other Documents on the Subject, and an Appendix, Containing

Letters on the Unhealthy Condition of the Lower Class of Dwellings; Especially in Large Towns; Founded on the First Report of the Health of Towns Commission, with Notices of Other Documents on the Subject, and an Appendix, Containing

By (author) 

List price: US$15.83

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1845 edition. Excerpt: ...to the state of the air, and the direction of the wind, more or less to the whole community. (1) " The process of dry grinding, especially needle pointing, may be mentioned as being particularly apt to induce consumption, from the inhalation of the metallic particles projected into the air." (I. 142.) Again, " Those who use glazed cards, for instance, little think how many palsied hands are due to the glaze which the manufacturers use." (I. 101.) Slaughter houses may be properly ranged under this head, on which the evidence is as follows: " By introducing living animals, and slaughtering them in different parts of the town, you bring into it, ostensibly for food, the whole of the animal, perhaps only two thirds of the animal being really useful for food? Yes." (I. 66.) "Other sources of unhealthiness may arise from the knackers' yards, in one of which I was informed that sixty horses were slaughtered weekly. Different kinds of animals are skinned here, and the bones boiled, which occasion a sickening smell; and heaps of bones may be seen in the'yard, the washings of which, with the ofl'al from the animals, are thrown into the Fleet ditch." (I. 116.) N 0 wonder that under such circumstances, the Streams and Rivers running through our towns are often vehicles of pollution to the atmosphere, answering to the following description of the Medlock, in Manchester: " In addition to the filth drained from the streets and houses, it receives the waste from numerous dye works, print works, and factories, the whole forming the vilest compound of villanous smells that the most lively imagination can conceive. Part of this fluid filth is retained to feed the Duke of Bridgewater's canal, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 95g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236769503
  • 9781236769503