Letters, from Portugal, Spain, and France, During the Campaigns of 1811, 1812, & 1813; And from Belgium and France, in 1815, by a British Officer [J. Hope].

Letters, from Portugal, Spain, and France, During the Campaigns of 1811, 1812, & 1813; And from Belgium and France, in 1815, by a British Officer [J. Hope].

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1819 edition. Excerpt: ...one brigade of General Hamilton's division of Portuguese, (at present commanded by the Conde D'Amarante), a few cavalry, and some pieces of artillery, and approach the enemy by the pass of Lanz; and to the Earl of Dalhousie, to march, with the 7th. division, and menace the right of the enemy by a movement on San Estevan. About seven o'clock on the morning of the 2d instant, Sir Rowland Hill's corps marched from their camp at Pampeluna, and in the afternoon encamped in a wood a little in front of the village of La Zarza. On the 3d, under a dreadful rain, we advanced to a barren heathy mountain, two miles in front of the town of Lanz. At an early hour on the 4th, we were aroused by the bugle's shrill sound, and in a few minutes marched in search of the foe. At noon, we came in sight of their advanced posts, after a long and fatiguing march through the dreary and romantic pass of Lanz. The necessary dispositions having been made to attack the enemy, our brigade, under Colonel Cameron, and led by Lieutenant-General Stewart in person, marched from the defile in the mountains through the village of Almandos; then turning to the right, we filed by a narrow foot-path to a deep ravine, about 400 yards from the village. The ascent of the right bank of the ravine being very abrupt, and the whole face of it completely covered with loose round stones, we were every moment in danger of having our skulls fractured, by their rolling from beneath the feet of our friends aboe. With considerable difficulty, we at length succeeded in gaining the top of the bank. The enemy made no attempt to arrest our progress, although 100 men would have been quite sufficient to have done so for a length of lime. As soon as Sir Rowland Hill perceived that we had established...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 68 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 141g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236610741
  • 9781236610744