Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, Earl of Chesterfield, to His Son, Philip Stanhope, Esq. Late Envoy-Extraordinary at the Court of Dresden; Together with Several Other Pieces on Various Subjects Volume 2

Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, Earl of Chesterfield, to His Son, Philip Stanhope, Esq. Late Envoy-Extraordinary at the Court of Dresden; Together with Several Other Pieces on Various Subjects Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1792 edition. Excerpt: ...have none; but if ever you have, I beg, at least, they may be all your own. 'Vices of adoption are, of all others, the most disgraceful and unpardonable. There are degrees in vices, as-well as in virtues; and I must do my countrymen the justice to fay, they generally take their vices in the lowest degree. Their gallantry is the infamous mean, debauchery of stews, justly attended and rewarded by the loss of their health, as welf as their character. Their pleasures of the table end in beastly drunkenness, low riot, broken windows, and very often (as they well deserve) broken bones. They gane, for the fake of the vice, not of the amusement; and therefore carry it to excess; undo, or are undone by their companions. By such conduct, and in such company abroad, they come home, the unimproved, illiberal, and ungentleman-like creatures, that one daily sees them.. that is, in the Park, and in the streets, for one never meets them in good company; where they have neither manners to present themselves, nor merit to be received. But, with the manners of footmen and grooms, they assume their dress too; for you must have observed them in the streets here, in dirty blue frocks, with oaken sticks in their hands, and their hair greasy and unpowdered, tucked up under their hats of an enormous size. Thus sinished and adorned by their travels, they become the disturbers of play-houses; they break the windows, and commonly the landlords, of the taverns where they drink; and are at once the support, the terror, and the victims, of the bawdyhouses they frequent. These poor mistaken people think they shine, and so they do indeed; but it is as putrefaction shines, in the dark. H 4 I am I am not now preaching to you, like an old fellow, upon either religious or...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 94 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 181g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236927672
  • 9781236927675