Letters Sent Home. Out and Home Again by Way of Canada and the United States, Or, What a Summer's Trip Told Me of the People and the Country of the Great West

Letters Sent Home. Out and Home Again by Way of Canada and the United States, Or, What a Summer's Trip Told Me of the People and the Country of the Great West

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1875 edition. Excerpt: ... with which additional land may be always obtained, will prevent any alteration from this state of things for a very.long time to come. Sir Charles Lyell, writing of Canada thirty years ago, remarks: --" In one of my first excursions to the West I saw a man felling trees in March, who, when I returned in October, had harvested a crop of Indian corn, grown on the very spot. He had also the leaves and stems of the plant to save for winter fodder for his cattle. He was an emigrant, newly arrived, and entirely without the capital indispensable to enable him to cultivate wheat, which must have been twelve or thirteen months in the ground before it could be reaped." And you can see this at every turn you take. Men can get all they want, and all they enjoy, at the smallest possible expenditure of labour, and so long as there remains millions of acres of land uncleared, and which is to be had almost for the asking, and which may be partially cleared and made amply productive at the smallest modicum of cost, they will not prefer making a thorough clearance of the land simply for appearance. In twenty of thirty years' time, no doubt, there will be large, well-cleared districts; but even then it will be less trouble to acquire an acre of new land by chopping down trees, than it will be to clear off and thoroughly clean a few lug only of roots and stones. As a rule, the instinct of the emigrant will lead him to acquire land; the natural pride of the man who has settled down into the home he has made, or some push from outside only, will lead him to make that land look its best, irrespective of the question of profit. From Hamilton, onward, the country assumed a different appearance to anything I had previously noticed. Generally, the land had been...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 140 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 263g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236496248
  • 9781236496249