Letters, Historical and Botanical, Relating Chiefly to Places in the Vale of Teign; And Particularly to Chudleigh, Lustleigh, Canonteign, and Bovey-Tracey

Letters, Historical and Botanical, Relating Chiefly to Places in the Vale of Teign; And Particularly to Chudleigh, Lustleigh, Canonteign, and Bovey-Tracey

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1851 edition. Excerpt: ...and Aller Mills; constituting two independent deposits, probably of manufacture of common ware and tobacco pipes. The clay is worked in open pits of various depths, where it is cut into cubical lumps, and sent to various potteries. the same era. There are quartrlose, ferruginous, and felspar clays. "he latter are used for the fine wares, the former for the "The form of the Bovey level is that of an heraldic lozenge. There must have been a great action to sever its once continuity of formation from side to side. This might have taken place when the vallies of the rivers Teign and Bovey were excavated by the force of waters, in a direction contrary to that of the general geological formation. The carbonaceous schist of Ugbrook Park--of Bickington to Buckfastleigh--the carboniferous lime of Kingsteignton and Highweek--the green sand at Knighton and Coldeast on the north of Bovey Heath, in a direct line with that of Haldon--all appear to have been separated without any displacement of their geologic bearings; all were carried on in the course taken by the mighty waters of the Teign and Bovey. Previous to that was the deposit of the Bovey coal. Contemplating the result we may ask, with Guvier, "Qui ne voit ici la merci de Dieu preparant d'avance dans le sien de la mer les nouvelles habitations des hommes? " From the outskirts of the clay deposit must now be noticed the argillaceous schist formation. Although this has clay as one of its chief constituents, it belongs to a different formation of an earlier era. These argillaceous shales may be traced from Knighton to Pitt, Stokelake, Chudleigh, Filleigh, and in the vale between Trnsham and Whiteway. They present no particular geological character, but exhibit a...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 38 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 86g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236975642
  • 9781236975645