The Letters of Charles Lamb. How I Traced Charles Lamb in Hertfordshire. Nether Stowey. Coleridge's Ode to Wordsworth. the Death of Tennyson. the Secret of Charm in Literature. the Influence of Chaucer Upon His Successors. the Illiterate

The Letters of Charles Lamb. How I Traced Charles Lamb in Hertfordshire. Nether Stowey. Coleridge's Ode to Wordsworth. the Death of Tennyson. the Secret of Charm in Literature. the Influence of Chaucer Upon His Successors. the Illiterate

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1905 edition. Excerpt: ...them to extricate themselves. And the strange plea is more than once advanced in their behalf that the lovers wooed, and were wooed, respectively, " against their will," though the development of the story, as worked out by the dramatist, by no means supports this pretension. The lady, more especially, never from the first offers any appreciable resistance to the course that events are taking. It is this undetermined attitude of the dramatist that more than anything else makes his treatment of the theme unsatisfying. With whom lies the chief responsibility for the guilt of the lovers--if guilt it be--is left unsettled. The great poet who first treated the subject was able to throw no light on it in this direction, save in so far that he recognised eternal punishment as its righteous doom. Dante had no room for detail in his consummate and world-famous episode. He does not add a word that could lead the reader to take a side in the matter. The deformity and savage temper of the husband, and the deceit practised on the unhappy maiden by her father, in allowing her to believe that it was Paolo to whom she was betrothed, are alike ignored. The simple outlines of the story--an ill-assorted match, love, temptation, retribution--are indicated; and in the space of some fifty lines no more could have been told. But when Dante's version was chosen for expansion into either narrative verse or drama, this policy of reticence became no longer possible. Leigh Hunt recognised this when he wrote his Story of Rimini. He felt that some palliation must be provided for the infidelity of the lady, and he found it in the treachery of her own father. Indeed, that there should be no mistake in the matter, he boldly labelled his poem, The Story...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 154g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236823931
  • 9781236823939