Letters Addressed to the Countess of Ossory, from the Year 1769 to 1797; Now First Printed from Original Mss. Edited, with Notes, by R. Vernon Smith Volume 1

Letters Addressed to the Countess of Ossory, from the Year 1769 to 1797; Now First Printed from Original Mss. Edited, with Notes, by R. Vernon Smith Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1848 edition. Excerpt: ...begin not to like it. The Duke of Richmond, who is returned, thinks Maurepas will keep off the war as long as he can, and yet the duke owns the preparations are prodigious; and that Spain has insisted on this armament. Do they humour her in an armament, and yet mean nothing by it % Where have we an army, except of Irish peers? When is Henrietta to take possession of Warwick Castle % Is a Dun cow to be roasted whole, or boiled in Guy's caldron 1 Lady Powis is gone for such an exploit on her son's coming of age. This is all I know upon earth, but that my hay is a perfect water souchy, and my roses and orange-flowers all drowned; and I am such a heathen, that I am more sorry for my nosegays than my revenue. Have you had but a patriot court? that is, a thin one? You see I am disposed, madam, to pay my quitrents, though I have but a pepper-corn; but we that know nothing, can say nothing. Jemmy The eldest Miss Vernon.--Ed. Brudenel no doubt can write volumes full of matter, happy man, say I. He dwells amidst the royal family, and can Of all our Edwards, all our Henrys talk; of whom, thank Heaven! there is a tolerable quantity. I shall be much better company when the French land; though as I have a little money in the stocks, to be sure it will not be very pleasant. Adieu! madam, write to me, that I may have something to answer at least. LETTER LXXXIV. Arlington Street, July 13, 1776. When the wind blows, wait for the Echo. If your lady believes all you read in the papers, I humbly pity you. Instead of crediting a quarter, I have the honour to think that there is little but lies in the accounts from America. I see regiments and ships sending every day, as if the ministers thought they had not yet half force enough there, though by their own...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 124 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 236g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236888650
  • 9781236888655