A Letter on the Nature and Effects of the Tread-Wheel, as an Instrument of Prison Labour and Punishment, Addressed to the Right Hon. Robert Peel, M.P. His Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Home Department, &C. With an

A Letter on the Nature and Effects of the Tread-Wheel, as an Instrument of Prison Labour and Punishment, Addressed to the Right Hon. Robert Peel, M.P. His Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Home Department, &C. With an

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1824 edition. Excerpt: ...of."-This is quite natural: --and I will assign at least one probable cause. The Wheel has only been in operation since August 1822, and there have been several intervals of intermission. Those, therefore, who have been sentenced for two years, day after day to undergo this unnatural and exhausting toil, would gradually suffer more from its injurious effects. Che.istophee Lamboen. " I am worse than I was a time ago. I acted as wardsman, and I had extra food. I am now very weak, and I have a great shortness of breath. I have too, a swelling or kernel under my jaw, arising I think from cold." But, you do not consider the labour on the Wheel in itself very hard? " Yes, I do, Sir. The labour is too hard for me, I have done hard labour before I came here, but I have found no labour like this." If you had more food, should you then consider the labour too hard? " I. should be able to stand the work better, Sometimes I sweat on the Wheel--I get down--and I get cold. Cold shivers come over me--and my bones all over seem so sore." Do you sleep at night? " Sometimes I rest, and sometimes I do not rest." The Governor afterwards added, that the character of this prisoner entitled his statement to consideration. He has lost in weight twenty pounds. Joseph Cohen. I inquired of the Governor if he considered that the statement of this prisoner could be depended upon? " I think not, Sir;" and from his contradictory statements to me I am inclined to form the same conclusion. Joseph Lay. Having read over his former statement, I inquired, Do you still suffer any pain? " I suffer in my loins and calves of my legs, and I have a pain in my breast. It is owing to the Mill, and want of food." When do you suffer most? " When I am on the Mill--and in bed--I cannot rest. I...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 40 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 91g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236656369
  • 9781236656360