Letter of the Vice-President of the National Academy of Sciences, Communicating, in Obedience to Law, a Report of the Proceedings of the Academy During the Year 1866

Letter of the Vice-President of the National Academy of Sciences, Communicating, in Obedience to Law, a Report of the Proceedings of the Academy During the Year 1866

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1867 edition. Excerpt: ...of practice the inspectors would use the care and deliberation requisite in making the observation in that form. Besides, the fragility of the glass vessel forms a serious objection to its use. The committee have therefore given the preference to the ordinary copper can, eight inches in height, two inches in diameter, with a thermometer so attached as to have the bulb in contact with the liquid, and to be protected from injury by projecting rims of metal. This can should always be quite full when the hydrometer is immersed in the liquid, so that the reading can be taken with the eye nearly in the surface-plane of the liquid. For the loading of the bulb, a method proposed by Mr. G. Tagliabue, of New York, was approved by the committee. It consists of the requisite weight of fusible metal placed in the bottom of the bulb, and fused there into a closely fitting button. This is very compact and strong, and avoids the narrow neck of the bulb filled with mercury or shot, common in other forms of glass hydrometers. _ The form of hydrometers being thus determined upon, the next step was to establish the scales for the same. The following table gives the densities of alcoholic spirits for every per cent. of alcohol contained in the mixture, by volume, reckoned upon the volume of the mixture of alcohol and water. This table is derived from the experiments of Gilpin and Blagden, and is more generally known as Tralles' alcohol scale. The densities are referred to water at its maximum density--about 39.40 Fahrenheit--as unity; hence that of 0 per cent., or water, is given as.99910, that being its density at 60 Fahrenheit, the standard temperature of the table. The length of the part of the stem immersed is likewise given, being counted from the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 28 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236852982
  • 9781236852984