A Letter to Sir William Pulteney, Bart. Member for Shrewsbury, on the Subject of the Trade Between India and Europe

A Letter to Sir William Pulteney, Bart. Member for Shrewsbury, on the Subject of the Trade Between India and Europe

By (author) 

List price: US$14.14

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1802 edition. Excerpt: ...Free Merchant is placed in a situation, by the previous sale of his Indian cargo, to require the Manufactures of this H2 Country for his returning lading, it is impossible that he can in any degree contribute to promote the views of the Legislature by stimulating this industry. How are these extra ships, proposed to be supplied by the Company, to be provided with cargoes on their outward voyage r Either the Company, or the Free Merchant, must find them lading. But the Company cannot do this without interfering with their regular Shipping, and thereby disturbing their own system; and the Free Merchant will not do it till the sale of his cargo, consigned to Europe, has provided him with the means. We must first, therefore, look to the means of facilitating the arrival of this cargo from India. To this may be added, that nothing of doubt must attach on the possibility of obtaining the requisite tonnage for his goods. But how can he rely on the invariable arrival of ships liable to all the casualties of the seas? By providing his own tonnage, he embarks in his speculations with confidence, because he has before him the certain means of immediately shipping his goods for Europe. By depending on the Company, he is the sport of chance. In the one case he is made liable to disappointment: in the the other, he is protected from its occurring. Such a plan, therefore, while it involves the Company in loss, and represses the industry of the British Manufacturer, would not be a relief to the Free Merchants against the inconveniencies stated. With respect to the Public, the subject is still of a deeper importance. It involves not only commercial, but political considerations of the first magnitude. It has long been admitted, that a scarcity of ship-timber, fit...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 34 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236577922
  • 9781236577924