Lessons from the Identity Trail

Lessons from the Identity Trail : Anonymity, Privacy and Identity in a Networked Society

Edited by 

Free delivery worldwide

Available. Dispatched from the UK in 3 business days
When will my order arrive?

Description

During the past decade, rapid developments in information and communications technology have transformed key social, commercial and political realities. Within that same time period, working at something less than internet speed, much of the academic and policy debates arising from these new and emerging technologies have been fragmented. There have been few examples of interdisciplinary dialogue about the potential for anonymity and privacy in a networked society. Lessons from the Identity Trail fills that gap, and examines key questions about anonymity, privacy and identity in an environment that increasingly automates the collection of personal information and uses surveillance to reduce corporate and security risks. This project has been informed by the results of a multi-million dollar research project that has brought together a distinguished array of philosophers, ethicists, feminists, cognitive scientists, lawyers, cryptographers, engineers, policy analysts, government policy makers and privacy experts.
Working collaboratively over a four-year period and participating in an iterative process designed to maximize the potential for interdisciplinary discussion and feedback through a series of workshops and peer review, the authors have integrated crucial public policy themes with the most recent research outcomes.
show more

Product details

  • Hardback | 592 pages
  • 160.02 x 236.22 x 43.18mm | 929.86g
  • Oxford University Press Inc
  • New York, United States
  • English
  • 0195372476
  • 9780195372472

Review quote

"This volume promises to make important contributions to policy and scholarly thinking about developments in information technologies and changes in social, cultural and personal practices and values. Ian Kerr and his talented colleagues explore the intricacies of privacy, identity and anonymity applying fresh analytical approaches, revealing the limitations of several traditional concepts, and identifying new insights on these critically important issues. The editors have effectively fused a range of multidisciplinary perspectives to enrich and sharpen the analysis and intellectual contribution. This book is likely to generate more informed and nuanced dialogue among scholars, technologists, and policymakers." --Priscilla M. Regan, George Mason University "This volume promises to make important contributions to policy and scholarly thinking about developments in information technologies and changes in social, cultural and personal practices and values. Ian Kerr and his talented colleagues explore the intricacies of privacy, identity and anonymity applying fresh analytical approaches, revealing the limitations of several traditional concepts, and identifying new insights on these critically important issues. The editors have effectively fused a range of multidisciplinary perspectives to enrich and sharpen the analysis and intellectual contribution. This book is likely to generate more informed and nuanced dialogue among scholars, technologists, and policymakers." --Priscilla M. Regan, George Mason University
show more

About Ian Kerr

Ian Kerr holds a three-way appointment in the Faculty of Law, the Faculty of Medicine and the Department of Philosophy at the University of Ottawa. Dr. Kerr teaches in the areas of moral philosophy and applied ethics, internet and ecommerce law, contract law and legal theory. He has published extensively in journals on ethical and legal aspects of digital copyright, automated electronic commerce, artificial intelligence, cybercrime, nanotechnology, internet
regulation, ISP and intermediary liability, and online defamation. He is also the co-author of Managing the Law (Prentice Hall).
show more

Table of contents

PART 1: PRIVACY ; Soft Surveillance, Hard Consent: The Law and Psychology of Engineering Consent ; Approaches to Consent in Canadian Data Protection Law ; Learning from Data Protection Law at the Nexus of Copyright and Privacy ; A Heuristics Approach to Understanding Privacy-Protecting Behaviors in Digital Social Environments ; Ubiquitous Computing and Spatial Privacy ; Core Privacy: A Privacy for Predictive Data Mining ; Privacy Versus National Security: Clarifying the Trade-Off ; Privacy's Second Home: Building a New Home for Privacy under Section 15 of the Charter ; What Have You Done for Me Lately? Reflections on Redeeming Privacy for Battered Women Genetic Technologies and Medicine: Privacy, Identity and Informed Consent ; Reclaiming the Social Value of Privacy ; PART II: IDENTITY ; A Conceptual Analysis of Identity ; Identity: Difference and Categorization ; Identity Cards and Identity Romaticism ; What's in a Name? Who Benefits from the Publication Ban in Sexual Assault Trials? ; Life in the Fish Bowl: Feminist Interrogations of Webcamming ; Ubiquitous Computing, Spatiality, and the Construction of Identity: Directions for Policy Response ; Dignity and Selective Self-Presentation ; The Internet of People? Reflections on the Future Regulation of Human-Implantable Radio Frequency Identification ; Usig Biometrics to Re-Visualize the Canada-US Border ; Soul Train: The New Surveillance in Popular Music ; Exit Node Repudiation for Anonymity Networks ; TrackMeNot: Resisting Surveillance in Web Search ; PART III: ANONYMITY ; Anonymity and the Law in the USA ; Anonymity and the Law in the United Kingdom ; Anonymity and the Law in Canada ; Anonymity and the Law in the Netherlands ; Anonymity and the Law in Italy
show more