Legends, Tales, and Songs in the Dialect of the Peasantry of Gloucestershire, with Several Ballads and a Glossary of Words

Legends, Tales, and Songs in the Dialect of the Peasantry of Gloucestershire, with Several Ballads and a Glossary of Words

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1877 edition. Excerpt: ... and zed 'Twas harky-ol-o-gee. Tha look't at aal the arches roun' Wi' zig-zag pattern thur; An' aal the stwonin angels brown, Tha made a mity stur. Uh ax't the Clark what tha ded want--He zed thay'd buy, perhops, The angels and the cherrybims To put into thur shops. Tha zoon cleer'd out an' look'd aal roun' The battlemints an' tour, An' ta'ked aboot th' old church poorch An' stood in out the shour. Tha zoon wur up an' off agen, Rit droo th' village street; Ta zee the haunted Manur house In ruins tha did meet. A Gloucestershire Zong O' ZOCIAL ZlENCE. TJQOUR sarvant, my betters in station and wealth, 3J And thank 'ee fur drinkun the labourer's health; And, Zur, I can't tell you how grateful we be For the good advice you've a bin givun to we. Tis true, my grand friends, as afore me I finds, There's nothun like rubbun together our minds; For zo we both taches and lams zummat new--And now let me zay just a few words to you. Extravagunce--I bean't afeard to spake plain To the shrewd higher ranks--is the gentlevolks bane. What lots of you workun men falls a prey To that sad love o' yourn for show-off and display. No doubt you doan't spend all your incomes in beer, But what do your honse-rents, now, come to a year? Eight hundred, a thousand and moor, I be told, And by-m-by the furnitur comes to be zold. There's likewise your footmen in all zarts o' plush, Bedizened enough to make e'er a man blush; Wi' the hair o' their heads full o' powder an' grease; My friends, this here nonsense 'tis time vor to zease. In hoss-flesh and carridges, too, what you spends Is dreadful to think of, my unemployed friends; I doan't zay you ha'n't got no right vor to ride, But charruts and hosses you keeps out o' pride. And then thurs hoss-rheasus, I'm...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 24 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 64g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236891139
  • 9781236891136