Legenda Aurea - Legende Doree - Golden Legend; A Study of Caxton's Golden Legend with Special Reference to Its Relations to the Earlier English Prose Translation ...

Legenda Aurea - Legende Doree - Golden Legend; A Study of Caxton's Golden Legend with Special Reference to Its Relations to the Earlier English Prose Translation ...

By (author) 

List price: US$13.02

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1899 edition. Excerpt: ...he (Caxton) does not follow the older translation word for word, but sentence for sentence, frequently abridging." And he now admits the numerous changes by Caxton and additions, from the appendix of the Legenda, and from "the two French translations of the L. A.,"1 while "for the English saints he used native sources, apparently the Southern Legendary "--which Dr. Horstmann happens to have edited. A complete reaction from this view is represented in the editor of the Kelmscott Golden Legend (1892), Mr. F. S. Ellis. He claims to have discovered the very book in French from which Caxton took nearly the whole of his work, errors and all; this is the printed Vignay in the British Museum. But, unfortunately, Mr. Ellis did not know of the Stowe Mss., and certainly had never examined the English Mss. whose influence he declares to be nil. The text of MS. A. will speak for itself when compared with Caxton, and we shall show later how many things not found in V. (or S.) Caxton added." It would be out of our province to discuss the mere bibliographical points in connection with Caxton's Golden Legende, for which I refer to Blades and Aspland. The first edition of the Golden Legende was a tremendous undertaking for Caxton. Blades says (n, Lix): "The' magnum opus' of Caxton was undoubtedly the edition of ' The Golden Legend, ' 1483. The translation alone of this great work must have been no slight task, while, as to number of leaves (449), and size both of paper and printed page, it far exceeded his edition of 'King Arthur, ' 1 As if C. had used both Belet and Vignay; italics mine. Alteng. Leg., N. F., cxxxn f. which was the next largest" (for the size of the paper, see ib., p. xvn). (ir, p. 151) "Woodcuts...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 62 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 127g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236803124
  • 9781236803122